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Oct 19, 2014 / 56,552 notes
iamjapanese:

Pedro Escalona(Spanish, b.1949)
Rosas 2011    Tabla
Oct 19, 2014 / 230 notes

iamjapanese:

Pedro Escalona(Spanish, b.1949)

Rosas 2011    Tabla

(via justtowatchyoudie)

Oct 19, 2014 / 13 notes
earthstory:

Ruby with sapphire coreThere are two basic kinds of corundum, basaltic and metamorphic, with the most beautiful stones coming from marble hosted deposits in the Himalayas and its fringes. Localities such as Jegdalek in Afghanistan, Nepal, Mogok and Mong Hsu in Burma and Luc Yen in Vietnam all result from the metamorphosis of Tethyan limestone that were pushed up into mountains and transformed by the pressures accompanying India’s slow motion ongoing collision with Eurasia. As gems grow, they tend to do so in fits and starts, depositing new layers on pre-existing seed crystals as and when the conditions are appropriate. In this case it involves the concentration of aluminium from the changing limestone, along with minor trace amounts of the impurities that colour corundum. However conditions may change during one of the pauses in crystal growth, and it is not uncommon to find crystals such as this one from Gamesh Himal in Nepal (2.3 x 1.1 x 1.0 cm), where a blue/purple sapphire core has been overgrown by a later generation of ruby.Blue sapphire is coloured by a complex electronic interchange between iron and titanium in the crystal structure, while ruby gains its fiery hues from chromium. The type of impurity present in the parent medium changed between the two generations of corundum, creating this unusual visual effect. Such stones are commonly heat treated to remove the blue component, particularly the production from Mong Hsu where nearly all the stones exhibit this phenomenon. I also own a sample like this that I bought in Luc Yen in Vietnam some years ago. Loz
Image credit: Joe Budd/Rob Lavinsky/iRocks.com
Oct 19, 2014 / 231 notes

earthstory:

Ruby with sapphire core

There are two basic kinds of corundum, basaltic and metamorphic, with the most beautiful stones coming from marble hosted deposits in the Himalayas and its fringes. Localities such as Jegdalek in Afghanistan, Nepal, Mogok and Mong Hsu in Burma and Luc Yen in Vietnam all result from the metamorphosis of Tethyan limestone that were pushed up into mountains and transformed by the pressures accompanying India’s slow motion ongoing collision with Eurasia. 

As gems grow, they tend to do so in fits and starts, depositing new layers on pre-existing seed crystals as and when the conditions are appropriate. In this case it involves the concentration of aluminium from the changing limestone, along with minor trace amounts of the impurities that colour corundum. However conditions may change during one of the pauses in crystal growth, and it is not uncommon to find crystals such as this one from Gamesh Himal in Nepal (2.3 x 1.1 x 1.0 cm), where a blue/purple sapphire core has been overgrown by a later generation of ruby.

Blue sapphire is coloured by a complex electronic interchange between iron and titanium in the crystal structure, while ruby gains its fiery hues from chromium. The type of impurity present in the parent medium changed between the two generations of corundum, creating this unusual visual effect. Such stones are commonly heat treated to remove the blue component, particularly the production from Mong Hsu where nearly all the stones exhibit this phenomenon. I also own a sample like this that I bought in Luc Yen in Vietnam some years ago. 

Loz


Image credit: Joe Budd/Rob Lavinsky/iRocks.com

(via youreyesblazeout)


Oxfordshire Poppies
Oct 19, 2014 / 21,848 notes
theoutlawbible:

Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso, Gary Snyder, Kenneth Rexroth, Michael McClure, Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Peter Orlovsky. North Dakota, 1974
Oct 19, 2014 / 33 notes

theoutlawbible:

Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso, Gary Snyder, Kenneth Rexroth, Michael McClure, Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Peter Orlovsky. North Dakota, 1974

(via journalofanobody)

newdirectionspublishing:

Poet of the Week: Kenneth Rexroth (In the Sierra)
Rexroth once said, “I have always felt I was most myself in the mountains. There I have done the bulk of what is called my creative work. At least it is in the mountains that I write most of my poetry… There whatever past emotion and experience I choose to recollect and write down, take on most depth and meaning.” [Read More Here]
Oct 19, 2014 / 24 notes

newdirectionspublishing:

Poet of the Week: Kenneth Rexroth (In the Sierra)

Rexroth once said, “I have always felt I was most myself in the mountains. There I have done the bulk of what is called my creative work. At least it is in the mountains that I write most of my poetry… There whatever past emotion and experience I choose to recollect and write down, take on most depth and meaning.” [Read More Here]

(via journalofanobody)

Oct 19, 2014 / 6,519 notes
the-lost-blog:

Léon Bonvin - The Rosebush 
Oct 19, 2014 / 32 notes

the-lost-blog:

Léon Bonvin - The Rosebush 

(via everylovestoryisaghoststory)

Oct 19, 2014 / 384 notes
Oct 15, 2014

Cantabile in B flat - Frédéric Chopin

The houses
Are more bare
And nothing
Dims the hills.

October
Comes and goes
And in the moonlight
I wait for winter.

The silence
Is like moonlight
In one thing:
That it hides nothing.

Yvor Winters, “October,” American Poetry: The Twentieth Century, Volume Two (The Library of America, 2000)

(via chardonette)

Oct 15, 2014 / 293 notes
Oct 15, 2014 / 30,316 notes

(via chardonette)


"There is not love of life without despair about life."
Albert Camus, The Stranger
Oct 15, 2014 / 1,526 notes

"There is not love of life without despair about life."

Albert Camus, The Stranger

(via chardonette)

Surround yourself with the dreamers and the doers, the believers and thinkers, but most of all, surround yourself with those who see the greatness within you, even when you don’t see it yourself.
Edmund Lee (via seabois)

(via liketouchdownonarainyday)

Oct 12, 2014 / 377 notes